This beautiful pen has been made using Irish Oak wood as the main wood with African blackwood at the clip end. The centre band has been replaced with a piece of 2 tone Padauk showing off the blend of the woods 2 colours. The bottom barrel of the pen sees a sandwich between African Padauk ( reddish colour ) and African blackwood in between to provide a stunning look to the pen.  The wood gives the pen a wonderful glow and it has been finished to a with multiple coats of friction polish to give it a lasting finish while still showing off the quality of the wood. Premium fittings have been used to complete a high quality pen. 

The stunning detail in the wood makes this pen something onlookers will be envious of.

This pen has a great weight and is perfectly balanced giving a pleasurable writing experience. The pen uses a cross style refill available from all good stationary shops.

The pen will come in a black velvet covered box with clear top unless you upgrade to a wooden one.

Oak pen with multiple woods segmented

£16.99Price
  • African blackwood

     

    The dense, lustrous wood ranges from reddish to pure black. It is generally cut into small billets or logs with its sharply demarcated bright yellow white sapwood left on to assist in the slow drying so as to prevent cracks developing. Good quality "A" grade African blackwood commands high prices on the commercial timber market. The tonal qualities of African blackwood are particularly valued when used in woodwind instruments, principally clarinetsoboestransverse flutes,piccolosHighland pipes, and Northumbrian pipes.

     The timber is used mainly because of its machinability and dimensional stability. Deering Banjo Company uses blackwood ("grenadilla") to construct the tone ring in its John Hartford model banjo. Deering indicates that this reduces weight versus brass/bronze tone rings, and that the wood "plays in" (improves in tone) with use. Furniture makers from the time of the Egyptians have valued this timber. A story states that it has even been used as ballast in trading ships and that some enterprising Northumbrian pipe makers used old discarded blackwood ballast to great effect. The German knife company Wüsthof [Zwilling J. A. Heckles] has also begun to sell a series of knives with blackwood handles due to the wood's moisture repellent qualities. Gresso, a cell phone manufacturer based in Russia, recently began selling luxury cell phones whose casing is made from African blackwood.